What about your space helps you to be productive?

Question: What about your space helps you to be productive? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur

I love coffee shops as much as I love working from co-working spaces. If I don’t have a lot of conference calls (I almost exclusively take calls instead of in-person meetings if I can avoid), I like to sit, work and change scenery to different coffeeshops.

In my opinion, being around a crowd creates more inspiration and, weirdly, more focus.

I stay in my co-working space desks longer hours if I’m working on hands-on engineering or design work with my teammates.

Mehmet has embraced his remote team leadership style. Hear about his most helpful productivity trick and why he has "quiet" days for his staff.

Read full interview from Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur .


Interview with Deborah, a remote entrepreneur changing perceptions about remote work

It totally depends on my workstate at the time (see my conference paper on digital nomad workstates for more info). I've worked in so many different workspaces around the world, but the ones that always stand out in a positive way, are the ones that really understand the needs of their clients.

Generally, for me, this means:

  • Lots of natural light
  • Comfortable chairs and comfy areas
  • Clearly defined social and quiet working areas
  • A genuine desire to build a community by hosting relevant events
  • A steady supply of health (and less healthy) snacks and drinks so that I don't have to lose my flow when I'm working on projects that require deep focus.
  • I don't need to make too many calls but... DECENT CALLROOMS, folks! Whether you're using them or sitting near them, if they're not fit for purpose then everyone suffers.

I also tend to gravitate towards workspaces that demonstrate they care about sustainability.

Deborah has traveled the world sharing her research about the pros of remote work. See how she is helping companies and clients understand the importance of location independence.

Read full interview from Interview with Deborah, a remote entrepreneur changing perceptions about remote work.


Interview with Paul, a remote product designer who has found his zen

It’s a dedicated space, and when I step in and close the door behind me, the room is instantly calming.

It’s the only ‘kid-free zone’ in the house, but I also like to call it my zen zone.

I’ve kept it quite minimal by design —using whites, greys, and wood in the colours and materials. A green lava lamp (that I’ve had since I was a teen) provides a pop of colour and compliments the spider plant.

I have things in here that bring me joy —a couple of U2 records, my guitar, my Sonos speaker. A grey circular rug on the floor helps define the ‘workspace’ while a chair sitting just off the rug is where I can retreat to read, meditate, or jam on the guitar.

There’s a place for everything, so the room remains clutter-free: a pegboard beside the desk to hang my headphones and cables; the desk has storage while I also picked up a TV stand from Ikea, which is now acting as a space for my books. It’s a fine balance in a relatively small space, but it works and helps keep me focused.

The COVID-19 pandemic drove Paul to embrace remote work. See how he has adapted his routine to this new normal, and the one tool that keeps him organized.

Read full interview from Interview with Paul, a remote product designer who has found his zen .


Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker

Limiting distractions. Don’t work remotely from your bed or couch because you’ll want to watch TV or just take a nap. I like to keep my WFH space similar to my desk at work because it puts me in the mindset of needing to work.

For Lauren, remote work was a non-negotiable arrangement—see how she manages a hybrid remote work situation and her tips for those on the remote job search.

Read full interview from Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker.


Interview with Mike, a business developer with a one task a day remote work routine

I couldn’t be productive without a second monitor, wired internet connection, and professional headset.

A comfortable chair and a standing desk help to prevent fatigue, and I’m guessing that helps me to be more productive, too.

I believe the key to being productive when working remotely is setting up a dedicated workplace with a proper desk and a chair, even if it’s a little corner in the apartment. Just make sure that you can control any background noise and minimize distractions—that seems to work well for me.

Mike had a lackluster experience with remote work 12 years ago. Today, he has embraced location-independence. Hear about his "one task a day" routine & vital tip for job seekers.

Read full interview from Interview with Mike, a business developer with a one task a day remote work routine.

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