How do you avoid burnout?

Question: How do you avoid burnout? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer

I once experienced it, and I’m smarter now.

I knew I had to find work that I would enjoy doing, to stop dreading Monday mornings.

I make sure to sleep well, eat well, get enough exercise —all the things we hear about ad nauseam, but that are crucial to our well-being.

Saturday is my sacred day - no work stuff, not even freelance projects or blogging. And I like to do fun things throughout the week: see a movie, go out to eat, meet up with a friend. Balance is key.

A job ad in an online group led Pola to find her ideal career as a content writer—see her remote work & job seeking takeaways.

Read full interview from Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer.


Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur

To me, burnout comes when you do the same thing too often and too intensely.

I found the solution in two things that breaks both the frequency and the intensity of what I do that may cause burnout. One of them is making your body physically active. This is different for everybody.

For me, staying physically active involves things that occupy my brain’s active state. This could include things like skiing, ice hockey, basketball, and yoga.

I’ll give an opposite example. I used to swim super early in the mornings. Swimming is an amazing workout, but it becomes very automatic after some time.

For me, swimming is not a kind of activity that drifts my mind to other things than what I was working on. I actually think more about what I was doing, and it takes me back to the overwhelmed state of the work.

The second thing that worked well for me was finding something that was inspiring me. This can be in many different forms. Sometimes, seeing a live performance, reading a biography, or going to an art exhibition can accomplish this. For you, this may look like spending time with inspiring people.

So, find what will get you active and get inspired when you take a break. My long time go-to thing for me is an intense, fast-paced yoga class that resets me.

Mehmet has embraced his remote team leadership style. Hear about his most helpful productivity trick and why he has "quiet" days for his staff.

Read full interview from Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur .


Interview with Deborah, a remote entrepreneur changing perceptions about remote work

Such a good question. I'm not sure there's a one-size-fits-all answer for this.

As a small business owner, I'm aware of the tendency to relax a bit when I've got a lot of work commissioned and then go crazy on new business development when things are quiet.

I know this is not the best approach, though, because really I should be drumming up new business when I'm already busy. As an intermittent nomad, when I'm traveling, I always plan to carve out some time purely for work and some time purely for play. It doesn't always work out as planned, though as it can be really hard to switch off. My workflow fluctuates, so I do try to ensure that I give myself time to relax when I can.

Deborah has traveled the world sharing her research about the pros of remote work. See how she is helping companies and clients understand the importance of location independence.

Read full interview from Interview with Deborah, a remote entrepreneur changing perceptions about remote work.


Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker

When I’m feeling burned out, I like to take a walk with my dog. I go offline for an hour, get some fresh air, and then come back to my work. If I’m working from a coffee shop, I’ll leave and go to another one or just head home.

Changing my scenery helps a lot when I start feeling stir crazy.

For Lauren, remote work was a non-negotiable arrangement—see how she manages a hybrid remote work situation and her tips for those on the remote job search.

Read full interview from Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker.


Interview with Tyler, a director of customer success models how to start a remote work career

I know I am biased, but I think using a time tracking tool is really helpful. When I am working, I track my time. When I am not working, I don't.

It really helps me to know how much I've already worked in a day, week, month, etc.; if it's Thursday AM and you've already tracked 45 hours that week... uh oh. Having that little bit of friction to have to track time really helps separate things.

From networking to land a remote work gig, to building out an exceptional remote work tool stack, Tyler has quickly figured out how to thrive in remote work. See his tips for starting strong.

Read full interview from Interview with Tyler, a director of customer success models how to start a remote work career.


Interview with Paul, a remote product designer who has found his zen

I’ve burnt out before, so I can more readily recognise the signs if and when the flame starts to flicker.

For me, it’s taking a break by getting out in nature every day, exercising, meditating, or practicing gratitude.

The COVID-19 pandemic drove Paul to embrace remote work. See how he has adapted his routine to this new normal, and the one tool that keeps him organized.

Read full interview from Interview with Paul, a remote product designer who has found his zen .


Interview with Mike, a business developer with a one task a day remote work routine

I jog. It helps to clear my mind and keep burnout at bay. My schedule is pretty flexible, so if there are no calls scheduled, you might see me jogging the streets of Lviv in the middle of the day sometimes.

What’s also helping is going for long strolls with my baby son after work and spending time with my family cooking something tasty.

Mike had a lackluster experience with remote work 12 years ago. Today, he has embraced location-independence. Hear about his "one task a day" routine & vital tip for job seekers.

Read full interview from Interview with Mike, a business developer with a one task a day remote work routine.

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