How do you avoid burnout?

Question: How do you avoid burnout? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Shivani, a remote content writer who shares lessons learned

A good night’s sleep: I try to get eight hours’ sleep every night, so I’m awake and alert and ready to start my day! Sleeping badly just means I can’t focus and, over time, will fall ill.

Working out: This is the most important thing for me to avoid burnout. I run and lift weights, and I occasionally swim. When I’m at the gym, my phone is on airplane mode. It’s brilliant to help clear my head and give me an hour a day to just focus on myself and not on work or anything else. That hour every day translates into a better mood, better health, and a better night’s sleep. Endorphins are a wonderful thing!

After-work activity: I always have something to look forward to at the end of the day.

Whether it’s spending time with friends or family, or a book I can’t wait to get back to, I make sure to have something planned that makes me want to get up from my desk every evening.

Bonus points if it doesn’t involve my laptop or phone.

Minimum notifications: The only notifications on my phone are for calls, WhatsApp, and Todoist, and when I’m doing deep work, I put my phone face down, so I don’t even see those. I don’t have notifications set up for anything else. I have to manually check email, Slack, Notion, Twitter, etc. to see if there’s something for me. On my laptop I have zero notifications. It’s amazing how stress-free I feel when my phone isn’t constantly pinging.

Shivani provides all you need to know about making remote work...work. She shares tips on finding the best remote work opportunity and thriving once you get it.

Read full interview from Interview with Shivani, a remote content writer who shares lessons learned.


Interview with Stefan, a founder building a location-independent startup

I consciously take time to socialize and spend time with my partner. Most days, I do my best to turn off around six-ish and focus on being a human.

Also, prioritizing the gym 2-3x a week helps me stay healthy and maintain perspective.

Stefan now has total control over his time since leaving the traditional office in early 2019. Hear how his routine is helping him build a solid remote startup.

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Interview with Alexandra Cote, a remote digital marketer and freelancer

I'll leave here a list of ideas you can go through that I've also tried and might be of help to you:

  • Talk to a close friend or just a psychologist.
  • Change your job.
  • Create and schedule free time even when you don't feel like you need a break.
  • Sleep more and sleep in.
  • Meditate before going to sleep.
  • Find the main goals that will make you happy in life and do your best to achieve them.

Alexandra juggles freelancing, a full-time remote job, YouTube, and Skillshare instructing. How does she manage it all? Find out in her interview.

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Interview with Saibu, an HR content writer for a remote company

Taking breaks in-between work is key for me. The thing is, that break isn’t something I take to play a game or just sit in my room. It has to be an activity, like taking a walk or a house chore.

Hear how Saibu, a thriving HR content writer, navigates the complexities—and perks—of working with a remote team from Ghana.

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Interview with Molood, a CEO who shares how minimalism has improved her remote work experience

I exercise regularly, and I connect with family and friends regularly. Even though I do not meet people in person most of the time, I am connected and feel emotionally fulfilled.

I also take 2-3 days every week in which I do not work at all. I only relax, read, exercise, do some chores around the house, or do nothing at all.

If I feel that I am getting close to burnout, I simply delegate my work to my fantastic team and take a day or two off. I ask my employees to do the same.

We are there for each other in the company, and that is how we all dare to talk about overwhelm, family problems, etc. and ask for other members of the team to be there for us.

As one of the people who worked for me once said, “Remote Forever feels like a well-functioning family.”

As CEO and Founder of Remote Forever, Molood has made a career in teaching individuals and companies how to work remotely effectively. See how embracing a minimalist lifestyle has caused her to excel.

Read full interview from Interview with Molood, a CEO who shares how minimalism has improved her remote work experience.


Interview with Andrew, co-founder and CEO of Insured Nomads

Ever since I had open-heart surgery due to stress, I have had the mantra of ‘hurry is my enemy.’

I must enjoy the kids, take time for family needs and my own needs unless I want to burn out emotionally and physically again.

Andrew, co-founder, and CEO of Insured Nomads talks traveling while working, productivity tools, and the best advice he has received.

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Interview with Kirsten and Jay-Allen, remote team coaches & collaboration experts

With remote working, especially when working in your home, it’s too easy sometimes to blend your work and home life. Establishing boundaries for yourself is very important. For example, what hours will you work each day? Will you stick to that if nothing urgent comes along?

When your workday ends, that might mean closing your laptop and switching off, leaving work mode, not checking emails or messages.

It might also be necessary to schedule break time.

There have been many times when we have found ourselves in back to back meetings with no space to even eat during the day.

Remote team coaches, Kirsten and Jay-Allen, offer three pieces of advice for new remote workers and reveal the one question every remote job seeker should prepare to answer.

Read full interview from Interview with Kirsten and Jay-Allen, remote team coaches & collaboration experts.


Interview with Nico, marketer and advocate for remote worker mental health

Great question. Coming from an agency background, I've felt burnout HARD in the past. When it hits, it HITS, and it can be tough to recover. I truly believe mutual trust (between employee and employer) is the key to avoiding burnout, bitterness, motivation lack, or any other workplace poison.

When I know that I'm trusted and valued to do my job and do it well, that becomes a bigger motivator for me than even money, great benefits, or anything else.

"I've felt burnout HARD in the past. When it hits, it HITS, and it can be tough to recover." In this interview, Nico shares his strategies for balancing work and life and reveals the key to avoiding burnout.

Read full interview from Interview with Nico, marketer and advocate for remote worker mental health.


Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer

I once experienced it, and I’m smarter now.

I knew I had to find work that I would enjoy doing, to stop dreading Monday mornings.

I make sure to sleep well, eat well, get enough exercise —all the things we hear about ad nauseam, but that are crucial to our well-being.

Saturday is my sacred day - no work stuff, not even freelance projects or blogging. And I like to do fun things throughout the week: see a movie, go out to eat, meet up with a friend. Balance is key.

A job ad in an online group led Pola to find her ideal career as a content writer—see her remote work & job seeking takeaways.

Read full interview from Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer.


Interview with Pilar, director of Virtual Not Distant

I make sure that I stop work at some point. On Sundays, I used to do some work in the evenings when I was doing extra projects, but now I don't work on Sundays.

Now, not only do I no longer work on Sundays, but I don't touch the computer because I think it's really important to give the hands and the body a break and rest from the screen.

The phone makes complete disconnection really difficult, but that's one thing. The other thing I do, I take holidays away from London or work somewhere away from the city. I also do that in Spain.

The other thing I do is block a week every two months, where I don't have appointments or podcast recordings so that I really feel like my time is my own. I may also move these things so I can enjoy social interactions and coffee dates.

Hear about Pilar's flexible approach to managing Virtual Not Distant and the career-changing advice she received from a friend.

Read full interview from Interview with Pilar, director of Virtual Not Distant .

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