What do you like about remote work?

Question: What do you like about remote work? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Igor Kulman, a software engineer building iOS apps remotely

I like being the master of my own time and the flexibility.

When I need to go to the dentist or have something in the apartment done, I do not need to tell anyone or ask for time off.

Remote work opened new possibilities for me, I can work for a German company with no physical presence in my country just as easily as I could for a local company.

I also like the peace and quiet that allows me to concentrate on the job.

Igor converted a part-time contract into a full-time remote software engineering job—learn how he did it and his tips for working remotely.

Read full interview from Interview with Igor Kulman, a software engineer building iOS apps remotely.


Interview with Bennah, a remote ESL teacher that teaches kids English all over the world

What I like about remote work is that I could stay at home with my family since I am home based and could deal with different nationalities.

I can take a rest and hold my time whenever I am available. I am not compelled to go to an office and stay there for 8 hours every day.

After having classes with the kids I have nothing to worry about, unlike in the office, I would still bring my works at home and I don’t have time to take a rest.

Bennah is an ESL (English as a Second Language) Teacher who teaches students from all around the world while working from home.

Read full interview from Interview with Bennah, a remote ESL teacher that teaches kids English all over the world.


Interview with Shauna, founder and business consultant specializing in remote work

There are too many things to list.

Remote work is like an onion; there are so many layers to the benefits that it provides.

I love hearing individual's stories about how being able to work from their preferred location has given them freedom or flexibility to live a life true to them. I speak to businesses who have grown their operations and have been really successful, while also saving money by not having a physical office and having access to amazing global talent.

I speak to communities who are trying to create a remote workforce in their villages and towns so that people don't have to relocate to the cities and can be with their loved ones, while also improving local economic development.

Then there's climate change, of course, lower admissions with less commuting. There are just so many positive stories that have come from remote working, and every time I hear them, I become more and more passionate about the future of work and the remote working movement.

Shauna is a consultant that guides companies in thriving while remote—see her advice for staying grounded as a remote worker.

Read full interview from Interview with Shauna, founder and business consultant specializing in remote work.


Interview with Deb, a sales copywriter who transitioned from software development

I like a lot of things about remote work, so yes, I have more to add –

  • Being able to work in my pyjamas.
  • Being my own boss – very important since I know that my own future is directly commensurate with the efforts I put in. All the more important, since I was laid off my last job because of reasons that were not in my control.
  • The freedom of being able to work for multiple clients at the same time. I am constantly challenging myself, because each business is unique and whatever I need to do in a new project might be completely different from the previous one. One week I might be writing an email sequence for an e-commerce shop, the next week I might be writing website copy for a small business.
  • Having to learn new skills to keep on top of my game – just being a decent writer is worth nothing if you don’t keep yourself updates. I invest heavily in courses to constantly learn new skills – be it free courses offered by [Hubspot], or paid courses on various aspects of content writing and copywriting.
  • Being able to take a holiday from work as and when I want to.
  • Having the potential to earn much more than what I did as a salaried employee. For the last 6 months, I have consistently pulled in an average monthly income which is 4 times what I used to earn when I was working in my last 9-to-5.
  • Last, but not the least – getting a positive feedback from my clients from my clients and the feel-good factor, when they get in touch with me in a couple of months’ time telling me about the positive results they have got by utilizing the copy I wrote.

Deb made the jump from full-time software developer to freelance sales copywriter—learn how he made the transition.

Read full interview from Interview with Deb, a sales copywriter who transitioned from software development.


Interview with Elizabeth, a graphic designer and art director

If I had to pick one thing - it would be that working remotely allows me to do my best work.

Because I don’t have to endure a commute, I can arrange my day around my needs and the needs of my clients. If I need to join an 8 pm conference call, it’s easy to do that.

My creativity isn’t an ‘always on’ thing - and being able to work when ideas come to me, no matter where I am, is a game-changer.

Elizabeth provides the ultimate list of tips for aspiring freelancers and remote workers. Check out her game-changing tools, and advice for thriving as a freelancer.

Read full interview from Interview with Elizabeth, a graphic designer and art director.


Interview with Meryl, a digital marketer and master of home office organization

I'm spoiled and want to work in a home office for the rest of my career because it gives my schedule flexibility, the most comfortable dress code, zero commute (no way to start the day or go home with a stressful commute), solitude, opportunities to volunteer at an elementary school during work hours, and a clean kitchen and bathroom.

I also get sick far less often than when I worked in an office, and I don't have to deal with cubicle neighbors holding meetings on speakerphone.

When they did, I turned off my hearing aid. However, I prefer to keep it on! It's also nice to turn it off when it gets too noisy outside.

Meryl K. Evans is skilled at creating a home office that leads to remote work flexibility. See her advice for creating a successful workspace, and hear about her journey into freelancing.

Read full interview from Interview with Meryl, a digital marketer and master of home office organization.


Interview with Artur, an engineer who found purpose as an Intrapreneur

In the beginning, I was enticed by travel, but what I love the most is how democratic it is.

I can be a kid from Nowhere, Poland and have the chance of working with the smartest people in the world. I can chat with our CEO, Matt Mullenweg, who wrote software that runs over 30% of all internet websites. I can also work on a product used by millions of people all over the globe.

Yet—and here is the kicker— I did not have to leave my hometown to do that! I can hang out with my grandpa or old friends. I can visit my mom and invite childhood friends for a party.

If office jobs were remote by default places like San Francisco, London, or New York would not have such a horrible housing crisis. Remote work would allow the charming neighborhoods of Lisbon or Brooklyn not to be taken over by the more affluent, and it would also result in the prevention of pollution since there would be fewer commuters.

If more people started getting well-paid remote jobs and started spending this money in small towns within Kentucky, Idaho or Ukraine, it would be intriguing to see how it would change these communities.

This is the future of remote work that gets me excited, and I started Deliberate and Remote to help this happen. I want to help people get hired remotely, make deliberate life choices, and stop running on autopilot.

Artur realized entrepreneurship wasn't for him—see how he carves out his creativity and purpose as a remote Intrapreneur at Automattic.

Read full interview from Interview with Artur, an engineer who found purpose as an Intrapreneur.


Interview with Chanell, a freelance writer and social media manager

I love the freedom. It allows me to have the time to walk my dog, go to the gym, visit with a friend, or go on a vacation without the need to ask permission. I have always been excellent at self-management, so having the freedom to manage my whole schedule is excellent for me.

I also enjoy the fact that I get to work on a lot of different projects, and learn a lot about a variety of topics. This part of it helps me to never become bored with what I do.

I genuinely feel that I have the opportunity to work at my own pace, and which is honestly one of the best feelings.

Chanell is a freelance writer working from Atlanta that writes about business management tips and video game entertainment threads.

Read full interview from Interview with Chanell, a freelance writer and social media manager.


Interview with Ascencia, a content marketer, and avid gig economy professional

I like all things about remote work. And I see no reason why everyone wouldn’t do it. Once you work remotely, you wouldn’t want to go back (at least for me).

I LOVE the ability to work from anywhere.

Because that means I could travel while I work. This year, I’ve lived outside my house for two months. One month in Yogyakarta (a city in Indonesia) and another in Bangkok, Thailand. And take breaks (read: sleep) whenever I need it, as long as the work is done.

Economically, it’s cheaper than traditional office work. No commuting required! Especially if you live in Jakarta, the city with the worst traffic, that means A LOT.

The ability to work internationally without leaving the comfort of your home country, and being friends with people from around the world, understanding their culture, and opening doors to new possibilities are awesome.

Since I’m an introvert, I’m not a big fan of confrontations and office drama. Working remotely lessens these to a minimum, so I could focus on the important things, like results and productivity.

More free time = more time to do the important things and spend time with the people dearest to you.

A forgotten two-year-old Upwork account allowed Ascencia to become a content marketer—see how the gig economy has offered her an alternative path to success.

Read full interview from Interview with Ascencia, a content marketer, and avid gig economy professional.


Interview with Laura, a communications specialist and travel writer by night

I love the work-life balance that remote work offers. I love not commuting, not spending money on gas, and not having to wear business attire daily.

My home is very quiet and calm. I love that I don't have to leave it in order to establish a career.

I feel I accomplish more by working from home.

Laura Coronado discusses her method for juggling her career as a communications specialist by day and her side hustle as a freelance travel writer by night.

Read full interview from Interview with Laura, a communications specialist and travel writer by night.

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