How do you avoid burnout?

Question: How do you avoid burnout? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Shivani, a remote content writer who shares lessons learned

A good night’s sleep: I try to get eight hours’ sleep every night, so I’m awake and alert and ready to start my day! Sleeping badly just means I can’t focus and, over time, will fall ill.

Working out: This is the most important thing for me to avoid burnout. I run and lift weights, and I occasionally swim. When I’m at the gym, my phone is on airplane mode. It’s brilliant to help clear my head and give me an hour a day to just focus on myself and not on work or anything else. That hour every day translates into a better mood, better health, and a better night’s sleep. Endorphins are a wonderful thing!

After-work activity: I always have something to look forward to at the end of the day.

Whether it’s spending time with friends or family, or a book I can’t wait to get back to, I make sure to have something planned that makes me want to get up from my desk every evening.

Bonus points if it doesn’t involve my laptop or phone.

Minimum notifications: The only notifications on my phone are for calls, WhatsApp, and Todoist, and when I’m doing deep work, I put my phone face down, so I don’t even see those. I don’t have notifications set up for anything else. I have to manually check email, Slack, Notion, Twitter, etc. to see if there’s something for me. On my laptop I have zero notifications. It’s amazing how stress-free I feel when my phone isn’t constantly pinging.

Shivani provides all you need to know about making remote work...work. She shares tips on finding the best remote work opportunity and thriving once you get it.

Read full interview from Interview with Shivani, a remote content writer who shares lessons learned.


Interview with Stefan, a founder building a location-independent startup

I consciously take time to socialize and spend time with my partner. Most days, I do my best to turn off around six-ish and focus on being a human.

Also, prioritizing the gym 2-3x a week helps me stay healthy and maintain perspective.

Stefan now has total control over his time since leaving the traditional office in early 2019. Hear how his routine is helping him build a solid remote startup.

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Interview with Alexandra Cote, a remote digital marketer and freelancer

I'll leave here a list of ideas you can go through that I've also tried and might be of help to you:

  • Talk to a close friend or just a psychologist.
  • Change your job.
  • Create and schedule free time even when you don't feel like you need a break.
  • Sleep more and sleep in.
  • Meditate before going to sleep.
  • Find the main goals that will make you happy in life and do your best to achieve them.

Alexandra juggles freelancing, a full-time remote job, YouTube, and Skillshare instructing. How does she manage it all? Find out in her interview.

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Interview with Saibu, an HR content writer for a remote company

Taking breaks in-between work is key for me. The thing is, that break isn’t something I take to play a game or just sit in my room. It has to be an activity, like taking a walk or a house chore.

Hear how Saibu, a thriving HR content writer, navigates the complexities—and perks—of working with a remote team from Ghana.

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Interview with Andrew, co-founder and CEO of Insured Nomads

Ever since I had open-heart surgery due to stress, I have had the mantra of ‘hurry is my enemy.’

I must enjoy the kids, take time for family needs and my own needs unless I want to burn out emotionally and physically again.

Andrew, co-founder, and CEO of Insured Nomads talks traveling while working, productivity tools, and the best advice he has received.

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Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer

I once experienced it, and I’m smarter now.

I knew I had to find work that I would enjoy doing, to stop dreading Monday mornings.

I make sure to sleep well, eat well, get enough exercise —all the things we hear about ad nauseam, but that are crucial to our well-being.

Saturday is my sacred day - no work stuff, not even freelance projects or blogging. And I like to do fun things throughout the week: see a movie, go out to eat, meet up with a friend. Balance is key.

A job ad in an online group led Pola to find her ideal career as a content writer—see her remote work & job seeking takeaways.

Read full interview from Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer.


Interview with Deborah, a remote entrepreneur changing perceptions about remote work

Such a good question. I'm not sure there's a one-size-fits-all answer for this.

As a small business owner, I'm aware of the tendency to relax a bit when I've got a lot of work commissioned and then go crazy on new business development when things are quiet.

I know this is not the best approach, though, because really I should be drumming up new business when I'm already busy. As an intermittent nomad, when I'm traveling, I always plan to carve out some time purely for work and some time purely for play. It doesn't always work out as planned, though as it can be really hard to switch off. My workflow fluctuates, so I do try to ensure that I give myself time to relax when I can.

Deborah has traveled the world sharing her research about the pros of remote work. See how she is helping companies and clients understand the importance of location independence.

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Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur

To me, burnout comes when you do the same thing too often and too intensely.

I found the solution in two things that breaks both the frequency and the intensity of what I do that may cause burnout. One of them is making your body physically active. This is different for everybody.

For me, staying physically active involves things that occupy my brain’s active state. This could include things like skiing, ice hockey, basketball, and yoga.

I’ll give an opposite example. I used to swim super early in the mornings. Swimming is an amazing workout, but it becomes very automatic after some time.

For me, swimming is not a kind of activity that drifts my mind to other things than what I was working on. I actually think more about what I was doing, and it takes me back to the overwhelmed state of the work.

The second thing that worked well for me was finding something that was inspiring me. This can be in many different forms. Sometimes, seeing a live performance, reading a biography, or going to an art exhibition can accomplish this. For you, this may look like spending time with inspiring people.

So, find what will get you active and get inspired when you take a break. My long time go-to thing for me is an intense, fast-paced yoga class that resets me.

Mehmet has embraced his remote team leadership style. Hear about his most helpful productivity trick and why he has "quiet" days for his staff.

Read full interview from Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur .


Interview with Nico, marketer and advocate for remote worker mental health

Great question. Coming from an agency background, I've felt burnout HARD in the past. When it hits, it HITS, and it can be tough to recover. I truly believe mutual trust (between employee and employer) is the key to avoiding burnout, bitterness, motivation lack, or any other workplace poison.

When I know that I'm trusted and valued to do my job and do it well, that becomes a bigger motivator for me than even money, great benefits, or anything else.

"I've felt burnout HARD in the past. When it hits, it HITS, and it can be tough to recover." In this interview, Nico shares his strategies for balancing work and life and reveals the key to avoiding burnout.

Read full interview from Interview with Nico, marketer and advocate for remote worker mental health.


Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker

When I’m feeling burned out, I like to take a walk with my dog. I go offline for an hour, get some fresh air, and then come back to my work. If I’m working from a coffee shop, I’ll leave and go to another one or just head home.

Changing my scenery helps a lot when I start feeling stir crazy.

For Lauren, remote work was a non-negotiable arrangement—see how she manages a hybrid remote work situation and her tips for those on the remote job search.

Read full interview from Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker.

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