What advice would you give to a new remote worker?

Question: What advice would you give to a new remote worker? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Shivani, a remote content writer who shares lessons learned

It’s easy for the lines between working hours and personal time to get blurred, so it’s important to set boundaries and stick to them.

Everyone’s boundaries will be different — a dedicated workspace, a fixed time each day to stop work, not having work-related apps on your phone etc. — so find what works to help you disconnect and avoid burnout.

If you work from home, make sure to get out of the house! Even if you just go for a short walk or to run an errand, go out and get some fresh air. A change of scenery can do wonders for your productivity and mental health.

Shivani provides all you need to know about making remote work...work. She shares tips on finding the best remote work opportunity and thriving once you get it.

Read full interview from Interview with Shivani, a remote content writer who shares lessons learned.


Interview with Stefan, a founder building a location-independent startup

Know why you want remote. It can be lonely at times, so don’t forget the reason.

Do you want to travel more? Have time for your kids or family? Something else?

Stefan now has total control over his time since leaving the traditional office in early 2019. Hear how his routine is helping him build a solid remote startup.

Read full interview from Interview with Stefan, a founder building a location-independent startup .


Interview with Andrew, co-founder and CEO of Insured Nomads

  • Develop your skills as a specialist within your field.
  • Get credentialed, licensed, or certified.
  • Have testimonials from your clients so that your personal platform is solid.

Andrew, co-founder, and CEO of Insured Nomads talks traveling while working, productivity tools, and the best advice he has received.

Read full interview from Interview with Andrew, co-founder and CEO of Insured Nomads.


Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer

Figure out a routine that’s good for you and remember that remote work is still work.

In my case, that means dressing comfortably but professionally and having an actual workspace, as opposed to sitting on the couch. Have a solid to-do list and a way to keep track of your projects. And don’t forget to talk to your colleagues, not just about work.

A job ad in an online group led Pola to find her ideal career as a content writer—see her remote work & job seeking takeaways.

Read full interview from Interview with Pola, a Paris-based content writer.


Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur

Learn your unique ways to feel “connected. “ The remote work style’s biggest disadvantage is loneliness. It requires remote workers to be a little more extroverted.

You have to become more vocal (mostly with written communication) in the work environment. You can also surround yourself with other remote workers in co-working spaces or public places like coffee shops.

Whatever helps you feel like you are being social, identify those opportunities. Humans are social creatures, even if you are a super introvert.

Mehmet has embraced his remote team leadership style. Hear about his most helpful productivity trick and why he has "quiet" days for his staff.

Read full interview from Interview with Mehmet, a nomadic digital maker and entrepreneur .


Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker

Don’t slack off. Prove that you can be trusted to work from anywhere and do the job you said you’d do. Remote work is a privilege because not every company allows it. Don’t squander it.

For Lauren, remote work was a non-negotiable arrangement—see how she manages a hybrid remote work situation and her tips for those on the remote job search.

Read full interview from Interview with Lauren, a content marketing team lead and hybrid remote worker.


Interview with Kirsten and Jay-Allen, remote team coaches & collaboration experts

Create a “workspace”: Whether this means that you join a coworking space or set aside a place at home, having a clear ‘space’ that equals work will help you disconnect.

Trust people: Working remotely can feel quite vulnerable, people may take longer to reply because of timezones, or their responses might feel harsher than you’re used to. It’s likely that you’ll be working with cultures that are very different from yours and so people will communicate differently to what you’re used to.

Be yourself and be clear on what your needs are: Many people feel awkward when they join remote calls, the space feels different. Our advice is that you be yourself and bring your ‘full self’ to your remote teams. Be clear on what you need, and if you’re feeling that you’re not getting something, maybe you were hoping for more fun, and you’re feeling the team space is quite cold and disconnected, ask for this.

Remote team coaches, Kirsten and Jay-Allen, offer three pieces of advice for new remote workers and reveal the one question every remote job seeker should prepare to answer.

Read full interview from Interview with Kirsten and Jay-Allen, remote team coaches & collaboration experts.


Interview with Pilar, director of Virtual Not Distant

It depends on the kind of remote worker they are. Remote workers could be working away from their team, working for a fully distributed company, or working for a hybrid company.

So, I think the best advice is to know what kind of setup you are letting yourself into and to make sure that you love what you are doing or want to do what you are doing.

You want to like what you do not just because it is a remote job, because there are a lot of bad remote jobs. You want it to fit you, as well as for the team and the work you are doing to suit you.

Hear about Pilar's flexible approach to managing Virtual Not Distant and the career-changing advice she received from a friend.

Read full interview from Interview with Pilar, director of Virtual Not Distant .


Interview with Mike, a business developer with a one task a day remote work routine

I don’t think remote workers can be productive in the long run working from coffee shops. So my advice is very simple: get a dedicated workspace.

It can be a dedicated home office, a desk in a coworking space, or even just a corner in your apartment. It doesn’t really matter as long as it’s a space dedicated to work that has a good internet connection.

Mike had a lackluster experience with remote work 12 years ago. Today, he has embraced location-independence. Hear about his "one task a day" routine & vital tip for job seekers.

Read full interview from Interview with Mike, a business developer with a one task a day remote work routine.


Interview with Marian, a nomadic social media manager and day trader

Be positive, and apply for every job you feel that you can do. Tell yourself that you can be a remote worker even if you haven't done it yet. Be friendly, know your skills, and be proud of what you can do.

Day trading & virtual assisting has allowed Marian to see the world—in this interview, she lays out her routine and priorities for those thinking of traveling while working.

Read full interview from Interview with Marian, a nomadic social media manager and day trader.

Keep your remote working skills sharp—get notified when we post the next remote work interview! RemoteHabits will help you achieve your remote work goals!