What do you not like about remote work?

Question: What do you not like about remote work? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Jake, a customer success manager for Atlassian

I definitely miss the "water cooler" talk, team lunches, and sometimes I miss the buzz of working in a big city.

Jake was burned out on the San Francisco lifestyle—see how he transitioned from working in-office to working remotely for a remote-friendly company.

Read full interview from Interview with Jake, a customer success manager for Atlassian.


Interview with Cameron, a designer who works remotely at a WordPress agency

The only downside is that I sometimes miss the person to person interactions of working in an office space.

To make sure I don't turn into a hermit, I make sure to schedule time with friends at least once per week to hang out or play sports.

Learn how Cameron started full-time remote work after trying freelancing and starting a digital agency.

Read full interview from Interview with Cameron, a designer who works remotely at a WordPress agency.


Interview with Dani and Luca, digital nomads who have mastered work and travel

Working remotely is awesome; believe us. We are lucky, though, because we are traveling as a couple. We have friends who are enjoying their remote life but are also feeling loneliness from time to time.

The good side of working from an office is that you can enjoy the company of the people you work with and you can make jokes and spend quality time with them.

A remote worker may have Slack, but it is clearly not the same thing.

While traveling, you get to know a lot of people, but they last only a few days.

Dani and Luca have mastered the art of traveling while working—see their hacks & tips for thriving as digital nomads.

Read full interview from Interview with Dani and Luca, digital nomads who have mastered work and travel.


Interview with Laurel about helping companies transition to remote work

That so many workers are using location flexibility as an excuse to avoid work.

I have reviewed thousands of job applications in which the candidate says they want a virtual role just because they crave the freedom to travel, want the flexibility of working less hours, or feel the entitlement of not having to report to a boss. It is these attitudes that create the perception that remote workers are lazy and untrustworthy - because the perks of the job are being valued more than the job itself.

Too many people fail to remember that remote work is still work.

No one can build a business or a career without grit.

The remote workers that prove the stigma wrong are those that capitalize on location independence to fuel productivity, spark creativity, and maintain better work-life balance (which, in turn, enhances their job performance).

Flexibility and independence aren't the substitute for hard work, they are the reward for it.

Laurel is an advocate for remote work and helps companies learn how to work remotely through her consulting and writing.

Read full interview from Interview with Laurel about helping companies transition to remote work.


Interview with Betsy, a head of content and remote work routine expert

As a huge introvert, I was surprised by how lonely I felt when I first started working remotely. It definitely took time to build both online and offline friends as well as making the additional time to prioritize that.

It also takes a lot of discipline to work remotely and I think that can be a big adjustment for many people, especially if you're used to a typical 9-5 work environment. This concept is a big reason why I started writing about remote work on my blog. It was to help others who found themselves struggling with the transition to remote work.

Betsy Ramser is a content manager, blogger, and teacher who helps other remote workers thrive while creating a daily routine that works.

Read full interview from Interview with Betsy, a head of content and remote work routine expert.


Interview with Digital Nomad Sage, an entrepreneur and UX consultant

It gets pretty lonely. I like the peace and quiet of working from home, but you start to miss being around people that aren’t your family.

With a traditional company, there’s almost something new or interesting that happens to everyone when they come back from the weekend. You can joke around with them during lunch. With remote work, you kinda lose out on that experience and miss it.

The other thing that I don’t like about remote work is that your income is dependent on others and you don’t have the security that a stable paycheck from a traditional job provides.

From e-books to blogging, Digital Nomad Sage has become an expert on making money online—see his advice for developing an online business.

Read full interview from Interview with Digital Nomad Sage, an entrepreneur and UX consultant.


Interview with Katerina, a team collaboration consultant who sees the value of discipline

When working remotely, you need to be active in reducing the feeling of isolation. Also, professional development or informal learning requires more effort.

I'm not sure I would say that these elements make me not like remote work. It is just part of work that is not an issue if you work in an office. However, good remote work companies, those that are fully remote, will take care of this.

My biggest learning experience was to turn off the computer. I began using a tool that will shut off the computer at a set time. That helped to establish a pattern.

Katerina fell into remote work by accident - she reveals how easy and straightforward it can be to make discipline a daily part of remote work.

Read full interview from Interview with Katerina, a team collaboration consultant who sees the value of discipline.


Interview with Liz, a UI/UX designer and cowork advocate

My chief complaint is that it is isolating. Some may prefer the quietude or the lack of coworker chatter, but I felt the absence of the bustle of other people the most when I moved to a new city.

Professional contacts are also important for transitioning job roles and making strides in your career. The reason I started Ladies Work Remote was to create that professional network that you don’t get when you work from your house.

Liz is a traveling UI/UX designer—see her strategy for thriving as a digital nomad and her efforts to promote coworking.

Read full interview from Interview with Liz, a UI/UX designer and cowork advocate.


Interview with Harry, an IT Architect who works from home

It's difficult when your home is also your office, so I've always struggled with drawing the line between work time and home time.

I feel as though I've improved over the years, although the challenge increases if I'm approaching a deadline on a project.

Harry has worked remotely for almost 10 years as a senior mobile, web and desktop developer—learn how he balances work with family.

Read full interview from Interview with Harry, an IT Architect who works from home.


Interview with Chloe, a customer support freelancer and multi-project expert

Getting immediate responses can sometimes cause delays which in turn leads to frustrated customers, but overall, I have no complaints.

Chloe uses the flexibility of freelancing to her advantage—see how she successfully manages multiple projects at one time.

Read full interview from Interview with Chloe, a customer support freelancer and multi-project expert.

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