What do you like about remote work?

Question: What do you like about remote work? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Interview with Mark, a programmer building bespoke business applications

Having extreme flexibility to schedule day-to-day life interwoven with "traditional" working hours just feels right to me.

Now that my before- and after-work schedule is not dictated by a commute, I've found that I can enrich my social life with more spontaneous events with friends and family.

In terms of the work environment, there is a freedom in not having the "boss over the shoulder" or the "always-talking coworker".

This simple mastery over nearly every detail of your work environment is not only liberating, but thrilling.

Mark thinks that avoiding distractions and sticking to regular hours are perhaps the hardest parts of being a freelancer - learn his secrets to achieving a good work flow.

Read full interview from Interview with Mark, a programmer building bespoke business applications.


Interview with John, a full-stack web developer who works remotely

I love being able to set my own hours, being my own boss, not having to worry about commuting, working comfortably and you know taking meetings in pajamas.

John works remotely while using the latest web development technologies, learn how he works by reading his interview.

Read full interview from Interview with John, a full-stack web developer who works remotely.


Interview with Scott about working remotely for 20 years

I like that distractions are mostly of my own design.

There’s so much about commuting and office life that you can’t control, right down to someone talking to someone else in the room you’re in.

If I need quiet, I get quiet. If I need socialization, I can go out and make that happen. If I need to go for a walk, run or hike to clear my head, my door is right there.

Probably the best thing, though, is being able to be there for my family. If my kids forgot something at school, it’s not a big deal. Having a dentist appointment doesn’t derail my day, as it takes just a half hour. These are things I don’t have to tell my manager about, since they’re so quick.

Life doesn’t get in the way of remote work; it complements it rather well.

Scott is a designer and developer that's been working remotely since 1998, read his interview to learn how he's been successful

Read full interview from Interview with Scott about working remotely for 20 years.


Interview with Nikita, an entrepreneur building a website to learn anything

I like the freedom of being able to work from anywhere.

Not being bound by any location and also time is a really great thing. Although it does require discipline to be effective with this freedom.

Nikita is an entrepreneur working on his startup while optimizing his productivity—learn how he organizes his life and work to maximize happiness

Read full interview from Interview with Nikita, an entrepreneur building a website to learn anything.


Interview with Ayesha, a freelance writer that gained early clients through her blog

The best part of working remotely is the flexibility you get.

With kids and family, I strongly believe that at least one parent should be working flexible hours. It’s not possible for my husband since he’s working in advertising, so in our family, it’s me.

Ayesha is a freelance content writer—learn how she made the leap to remote work while building her blog and raising her family

Read full interview from Interview with Ayesha, a freelance writer that gained early clients through her blog.


Interview with Chanell, a freelance writer and social media manager

I love the freedom. It allows me to have the time to walk my dog, go to the gym, visit with a friend, or go on a vacation without the need to ask permission. I have always been excellent at self-management, so having the freedom to manage my whole schedule is excellent for me.

I also enjoy the fact that I get to work on a lot of different projects, and learn a lot about a variety of topics. This part of it helps me to never become bored with what I do.

I genuinely feel that I have the opportunity to work at my own pace, and which is honestly one of the best feelings.

Chanell is a freelance writer working from Atlanta that writes about business management tips and video game entertainment threads.

Read full interview from Interview with Chanell, a freelance writer and social media manager.


Interview with Mike, a software engineer who works remotely at GitHub

I like the time and location flexibility it affords me and my family. It decouples my preferred employer (currently GitHub) from my preferred location to live (Edinburgh, Scotland).

It forces my employer to judge me on how much I get done rather than how long I'm sitting in a particular chair in a particular office.

I like that I'm more productive working remotely than working in an office; it feels like both my employer and I are getting a better deal.

Mike got started with remote work after getting an offer from his dream organisation. Learn how he works remotely while working on open source projects and publishing books.

Read full interview from Interview with Mike, a software engineer who works remotely at GitHub.


Interview with Adam, a UX engineer building his own consulting company

I love the freedom.

Because my clients cannot see me day-in and day-out, they judge me based on my output and value, and not based on my time in a seat.

Because of that, I don't have a problem taking a long lunch or running errands, because I can always slot in my work time earlier/later in my day.

I'd rather have that flexibility with the shared understanding of high output than simply exist in an office for 8 straight hours just because it "feels" more productive to a manager or executive.

Learn how Adam started working remotely from a cold-email on Hacker News, to how he's using a local co-working space to grow his business.

Read full interview from Interview with Adam, a UX engineer building his own consulting company.


Interview with Igor Kulman, a software engineer building iOS apps remotely

I like being the master of my own time and the flexibility.

When I need to go to the dentist or have something in the apartment done, I do not need to tell anyone or ask for time off.

Remote work opened new possibilities for me, I can work for a German company with no physical presence in my country just as easily as I could for a local company.

I also like the peace and quiet that allows me to concentrate on the job.

Igor converted a part-time contract into a full-time remote software engineering job—learn how he did it and his tips for working remotely.

Read full interview from Interview with Igor Kulman, a software engineer building iOS apps remotely.


Interview with Deb, a sales copywriter who transitioned from software development

I like a lot of things about remote work, so yes, I have more to add –

  • Being able to work in my pyjamas.
  • Being my own boss – very important since I know that my own future is directly commensurate with the efforts I put in. All the more important, since I was laid off my last job because of reasons that were not in my control.
  • The freedom of being able to work for multiple clients at the same time. I am constantly challenging myself, because each business is unique and whatever I need to do in a new project might be completely different from the previous one. One week I might be writing an email sequence for an e-commerce shop, the next week I might be writing website copy for a small business.
  • Having to learn new skills to keep on top of my game – just being a decent writer is worth nothing if you don’t keep yourself updates. I invest heavily in courses to constantly learn new skills – be it free courses offered by [Hubspot], or paid courses on various aspects of content writing and copywriting.
  • Being able to take a holiday from work as and when I want to.
  • Having the potential to earn much more than what I did as a salaried employee. For the last 6 months, I have consistently pulled in an average monthly income which is 4 times what I used to earn when I was working in my last 9-to-5.
  • Last, but not the least – getting a positive feedback from my clients from my clients and the feel-good factor, when they get in touch with me in a couple of months’ time telling me about the positive results they have got by utilizing the copy I wrote.

Deb made the jump from full-time software developer to freelance sales copywriter—learn how he made the transition.

Read full interview from Interview with Deb, a sales copywriter who transitioned from software development.

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