What does a typical day look like for your remote teams?

Question: What does a typical day look like for your remote teams? Read answers from remote workers to learn.

Company Interview with Brad, co-founder and CEO of WebDevStudios

Our typical day isn’t much different from a traditional agency office setup—our team logs into Slack when they start their day. The project managers outline tasks and goals for their project teams.

We also utilize Slack bots for daily standups to find out what our team is focused on and if any challenges are in their way.

A challenging time finding talented local employees gave Brad the idea to make WebDevStudios 100% remote—hear about his strategies for creating a healthy remote work culture.

Read full interview from Company Interview with Brad, co-founder and CEO of WebDevStudios.


Company Interview with Jan, founder and CEO of Rainmaker Solutions

I’m not sure there is a typical day, but we tend to start the day with a stand up/video call to ensure everyone is clear on our joint priorities and their individual responsibilities.

Apart from that, we allow teams to manage their own time and projects. The organisation completely buys into the concept of our people being responsible for delivering their own outcomes.

Remote work is built into Rainmaker Solutions' DNA. See the beliefs that push this company forward & check out their virtual activities that are building organizational trust.

Read full interview from Company Interview with Jan, founder and CEO of Rainmaker Solutions.


Company Interview with Tricia, CEO of BELAY

First, we create or plan our ideal workweek – even before we put pen to paper – to make sure the things that we know have to happen weekly are pre-scheduled, recurring and sit at the same time on our calendars.

Then, depending on when we’re at our best – morning or afternoon – we schedule accordingly. Additionally, we encourage leaving buffers on our calendars because life happens.

We are steadfastly committed to respecting boundaries, work-life balance, and the tenet that we work to live and not the other way around.

For 10 years, BELAY has been a 100% remote work company. CEO, Tricia, shares the tools that keep them thriving and how boundaries & expectations contribute to their success.

Read full interview from Company Interview with Tricia, CEO of BELAY.


Company Interview with Jan Fex, CEO of DotDee Digital

  • A daily meeting is held every morning at 9 AM with the team where the day's activities are set up

  • A one-to-one daily catch-up between project lead and each dev (5–10 min) at around 1.30 PM

  • A close-of-business meet-up is held every day at 5.30 PM with the entire team. At this point, the devs have to share their screens and demo what they achieved during the day

  • All devs have to commit and push to the Master repo at the latest after evening meet-up

  • Every Friday the close-of-business meet-up also includes a review of the week passed

I blogged about this on Medium, where our Agile approach and GitHub Builder regime also are discussed.

A three-hour work commute motivated Jan to establish a full-on remote work arrangement for his company. What have been the benefits & challenges? See his takeaways!

Read full interview from Company Interview with Jan Fex, CEO of DotDee Digital.


Company Interview with Tammy, CEO of Workplaceless, and a remote work leader

There is no typical day. We do not follow a set routine on a daily basis. We all stay in sync on tasks and goals through the use of tools like ClickUp and through constant and consistent communication.

With Workplaceless, Tammy helps companies start off on the "right remote foot." Hear how her 100% remote team stays in sync, and how she keeps her employees engaged

Read full interview from Company Interview with Tammy, CEO of Workplaceless, and a remote work leader.


Company Interview with Maxime, Co-founder and CTO of Digicoop

We have various start times in the morning, but usually, everybody is connected by 10 am. We have a weekly meeting on Thursday, and the rest of the discussions happen in Mattermost or Kantree. All the work is listed in Kantree, so we do not need a meeting to know who is working on what as this is accessible there.

From making employees shareholders to letting workers take control of their roles, Maxime describes Digicoop's path to remote success.

Read full interview from Company Interview with Maxime, Co-founder and CTO of Digicoop.


Company Interview with Ivan, CEO of Base B

Generally, people come online, they check their Slack and their email, and they have a stand-up meeting where they discuss what the challenges or roadblocks are, and what they plan to do for the coming day. Most of the communication throughout the day will happen in Slack with occasional video calls.

Ivan's company, Base B helps companies build effective remote teams. See the tools and training practices that allow them to excel in helping their clients.

Read full interview from Company Interview with Ivan, CEO of Base B .


Company Interview with Sharon Koifman, CEO of DistantJob

Through Basecamp, the entire team reports on their tasks in the morning. These are goals that they make for themselves during an all hands-on team meeting at the beginning of the week.

If there are any immediate or short term requirements, it is described on Slack and quickly transitions into Zoom discussions. If it is a long term project or brainstorm, it is placed on Basecamp, where we can discuss ideas and answers regarding the actual project, or we book a brainstorming session.

We are very careful not to schedule too many meetings or to message people without a proper description because distraction management is very important for us.

Of course, at the end of the day, we love to see the accomplishments and conclusions of the tasks and projects on Basecamp as well.

With DistantJob, Sharon has created a mistake-friendly environment where managers lead by example. See his tips for building trust and security among his remote teams.

Read full interview from Company Interview with Sharon Koifman, CEO of DistantJob.


Interview with Shelly, CEO of Fire Engine RED & remote work pioneer

Just like brick-and-mortar companies, our team members work on their own projects and have scheduled department, client, and 1-on-1 meetings.

Twenty years ago, Shelly started one of the first all-remote U.S. companies. See how remote work has given Fire Engine RED a competitive advantage & the four most important words in the employee handbook.

Read full interview from Interview with Shelly, CEO of Fire Engine RED & remote work pioneer.

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